Christmas at Garsons

GARSONS ESHER & GARSONS TITCHFIELD

 

ADVENT | DECORATIONS | WREATHS | FRESH CUT & ARTIFICIAL TREES | LIGHTS | CARDS & WRAP | TABLEWARE ACCESORIES 

WELCOME TO OUR VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS

The Garsons story began in the Victorian era when the Thompson family started farming at West End Esher, Surrey back in 1871. To celebrate 150 years of Garsons we have transformed Christmas into an enchanted world of Victorian literature.

GARSONS ESHER
Immerse yourself into well-known children’s stories and poems. Written in the Victorian period these treasured tales continue to be celebrated by generations all over the world. You'll be presented with many carefully selected decorations and intriguing colour themes and displays to mirror famous titles including Snowdrop, A Christmas Carol, The Owl & Pussycat, Great Expectations, The Elves and The Shoemaker, A Secret Garden, The Jungle Book and Alice In Wonderland. Read about these famous stories below. 

GARSONS TITCHFIELD
You'll be transported into the works of Charles Dickens, regarded as one of the greatest novelist of the Victorian era, take a wander down the lanes inspired by Dickens much-loved stories and characters; Pickwick Street, Brownlow Borough, Copperfields, Fagin's Way, Little Dorrit Drive, Cratchit Copse, Curiosity Corner and Pip's Place. Read which famous stories these themes are based on below. 

 

Christmas is no doubt Garsons favourite time of year. We go all out. Visit us for all your needs, whether you're decorating your home or buying gifts for friends and family. You'll find tasty delicacies for the festive table in the Farm Shop too. And don't forget to post, or email, your letter to Father Christmas and we will safely guarantee he receives it.

THEMES AT GARSONS TITCHFIELD

You'll be transported into the works of Charles Dickens, regarded as one of the greatest novelist of the Victorian era, take a wonder down the lanes inspired by Dickens much-loved stories and characters; Pickwick Street, Brownlow Borough, Copperfields, Fagin's Way, Little Dorrit Drive, Cratchit Copse, Curiosity Corner and Pip's Place.

CURIOSITY CORNER
Taking its name from Dickens’ 1841 book, ‘The Old Curiosity Shop’ follows the tragic story of Nell Trent, who flees London with her Grandfather to escape the ‘evil’ debt collector Quilp, who has taken all their money due to her grandfathers gambling habit.

COPPERFIELD
Named after David Copperfield, the protagonist of Charles Dickens’ novel with the longer name of ‘The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account)’, published as a book in 1850. The story is told in the first person by a middle-aged David Copperfield, who is looking back on his life, recounting his ups and downs throughout life. David Copperfield is partially an autobiographical novel, with certain events following Dickens’ own life.

FAGIN'S WAY
Named after Fagin, one of the villains in Charles Dickens’ 1838 novel Oliver Twist. Fagin employs orphans such as Oliver and the famous Artful Dodger, to pickpocket around London. The novel follows the journey of the titular character, Oliver Twist. Oliver, an orphan since birth, spends much of his childhood at an orphanage with little food. One night, after being served his portion of gruel, Oliver asks for a second helping. This is frowned upon and Oliver is sent to work as an apprentice to an undertaker. Eventually, after suffering repeated mistreatment, Oliver runs away and heads for London, where he meets Fagin and an encounter with a kindly gentleman named Mr Brownlow.

PICKWICK STREET
Named after Dickens’ 1836-37 series of nineteen texts, ‘The Pickwick Papers’, it begins at a meeting of the Pickwick Club, where the members are honoring the founder, Samuel Pickwick. Mr. Pickwick intends to travel around the country, gathering stories and doing research, recording their experiences for the other members of The Pickwick Club. He will be accompanied by his three close friends: Mr. Tupman, Mr. Snodgrass, and Mr. Winkle.

PIP'S PLACE
Named after the protagonist of Dickens’ weekly instalments and later novel Great Expectations, Pip Pirrip. The story was originally published from December 1860 to August 1861 in a periodical magazine ‘All the Year Round’. Great Expectations follows the life of Pip, a country blacksmith’s apprentice, and orphan, who suddenly gets funded by a secret benefactor to move to London and enter its high society. During this time Pip becomes snobbish, however quickly learns the true meaning of joy and love when discovering the identity of his mystery benefactor, with Dickens attempting to tackle issues regarding social class.

CRATCHIT COPSE
Cratchit Copse takes it’s name from Bob Cratchit, the ill-treated, underpaid clerk of Ebenezer Scrooge in Dickens’ 1843 book ‘A Christmas Carol’. Cratchit has come to symbolise the poor working conditions endured by many working-class people in Victorian Britain. A Christmas Carol is novel about Ebenezer Scrooge, an old man who is well known for his miserly ways.  On Christmas eve he is visited by a series of Ghosts starting with his old business partner Jacob Marley. After the visits he awakens a changed man helping the less fortunate.  He especially takes a shine to Tiny Tim, his clerk, Bob Crachits’ ill young boy.

BROWNLOW BOROUGH
Named after Mr. Brownlow, a kind-hearted middle-aged man who helps Oliver to escape Fagin and a life of crime in Charles Dickens’ 1838 novel Oliver Twist. Fagin employs orphans such as Oliver and the famous Artful Dodger, to pickpocket around London. The novel follows the journey of the titular character, Oliver Twist. Oliver, an orphan since birth, spends much of his childhood at an orphanage with little food. One night, after being served his portion of gruel, Oliver asks for a second helping. This is frowned upon and Oliver is sent to work as an apprentice to an undertaker. Eventually, after suffering repeated mistreatment, Oliver runs away and heads for London, where he meets Fagin and an encounter with the kindly gentleman, Mr Brownlow.

LITTLE DORRIT DRIVE
Little Dorrit Drive is named after Amy Dorritt, the main character of Dickens’ 1857 book, Little Dorrit. It follows Amy’s life after she born and raised in the Marshalsea prison for debtors in London. She works as a seamstress for Mrs. Clennam, whose son Arthur takes an interest in the Dorrit family and eventually helps free Mr. Dorrit from prison. Arthur becomes a debtor himself and falls in love with Little Dorrit, but because their financial circumstances are now reversed, he does not ask her to marry him. In the end Arthur’s mother, a miserly, mean-spirited woman, is forced to reveal that Arthur is not really her son and that she had been keeping money from him and the Dorrits for many years. This circumstance leaves Little Dorrit and Arthur free to marry. The novel attacks the injustices of the contemporary English legal system, particularly the Victorian institution of the debtors’ prison.
 

THEMES AT GARSONS ESHER

Immerse yourself into well-known children’s stories and poems. Written in the Victorian period these treasured tales continue to be celebrated by generations all over the world...

ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Also known as ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’, this novel was written in 1865 by Lewis Carroll. One of the most famous pieces of Victorian literature, Alice in Wonderland plays with logic and fantasy, following Alice’s eccentric journey to Wonderland via a rabbit hole. Whilst in Wonderland Alice meets an assortment of strange, intriguing characters, including a talking caterpillar, the mad hatter, the Queen of Hearts and a grinning Cheshire Cat.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL
Perhaps one of the most famous Christmas stories, A Christmas Carol was written by Charles Dickens and was published in 1843. Ebenezer Scrooge’s tale of meeting the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future, and discovery of Christmas cheer and kindness, was hoped by Dickens to encourage people to be more generous, especially over the festive season.

THE JUNGLE BOOK
A collection of short stories written by Rudyard Kipling, the stories were first published in magazines from 1893-1894. The book consists of 14 chapters or stories, which are set in India, where Kipling spent his early childhood, and tell mostly of Mowgli, an Indian boy who is raised by wolves and learns self-sufficiency and wisdom from animals.

GREAT EXPECTATIONS
Written by Charles Dickens the story was originally published in weekly instalments, from December 1860 to August 1861 in a periodical magazine ‘All the Year Round’ directed by Dickens. Great Expectations follows the life of Pip, a country blacksmith’s apprentice, and orphan, who suddenly gets funded by a secret benefactor to move to London and enter its high society. During this time Pip becomes snobbish, however quickly learns the true meaning of joy and love when discovering the identity of his mystery benefactor, with Dickens attempting to tackle issues regarding social class.

THE ELVES AND THE SHOEMAKER
First published in 1806, The Elves and the Shoemaker was written by the German Fairy Tale writers, The Brothers Grimm. The tale tells of a poor shoemaker and his wife who gain much help and wealth miraculously overnight with the assistance of magical elves.

THE OWL AND THE PUSSYCAT
A nonsense poem by Edward Lear, The Owl and the Pussycat was first published in 1871 as part of his book, ‘Nonsense Songs, Stories, Botany and Alphabets’. The Poem was written for the three-year-old daughter of his friends and talks of the love between the anthropomorphic title characters, Owl and Pussycat.

SNOWDROP
One of the Brothers Grimm’s first stories, Snowdrop maintains many similarities with ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’, popularised by Disney’s first film released in 1937. Following the story of a beautiful princess, a magic mirror, a poisoned apple and the characters of the Evil Queen, Seven Dwarfs and a prince charming, it is truly a fairy-tale classic.

THE SECRET GARDEN
The Secret Garden was written by Frances Hodgson Burnett, published in 1911 and follows the story of a ten-year-old orphan, Mary Lennox, who discovers a secret walled garden in her uncle’s vast estate. This discovery leads to a much-changed Mary and her friends exploring the garden together, and through their friendship and interactions with nature, growing healthier and happier.